Martin House Research Centre Publications


The Martin House Research Centre has published over 20 papers on the care and support of children and young people with life limiting conditions or medical complexity, their families and the workforce that care for them.

The most recent publications from the Martin House Research Centre are below. To read all of the publications from the centre, click here.


GPs’ role in caring for children and young people with life-limiting conditions: a retrospective cohort study 
 

GPs are rarely actively involved in healthcare provision for children and young people with life-limiting conditions. This raises problems when these children develop minor illness or require management of other chronic diseases. This study aims to investigate the association between GP attendance patterns and hospital urgent and emergency care use.

To read the full paper, click here.

 

Paper on the effectiveness of bereavement support interventions for parents of infants and children who die: a systematic review

This study summarised all the published studies that have aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of bereavement support interventions for parents whose child had died. Only eight studies have been published since 1980 which have aimed to assess the effectiveness of bereavement support interventions for parents. Most of these were from the US and focussed on deaths around the time of birth or the first month of life. These studies all evaluated different interventions using different and often lots of, outcome measures. Despite measuring lots of different outcomes only 3 studies showed any positive benefit. We had concerns over the quality of reporting and methods of these studies which means that we cannot draw clear conclusions. Future research should clearly identify the important outcomes for parents and use appropriate research methods.

To read the full paper, click here

 

Paper on ‘Your Tube’: the role of different diets in children who are gastrostomy fed: protocol for a mixed methods exploratory sequential study

This paper describes the plans for recruiting children, parents and healthcare professionals into the 'Your Tube' study.  This study aims to address a research gap by assessing the symptom profile (reflux, constipation, pain) quality of life of children who are gastrostomy fed, and safety aspects (e.g. tube blockage) by comparing those who are formula fed and those who are predominantly fed a home-blended diet.  The study will also examine the impact on parents’ quality of life and explore costs to the families and the NHS.  The study is being funded by the National Institute of Health Research Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme. 

To read the full paper, click here.